Author: Rebecca Quist

Stakeholders indicate priorities on potential adverse effects of groundwater conditions through survey

In an effort to identify and prioritize stakeholder concerns relating to potential impacts that may result from groundwater conditions, MAGSA conducted a survey. The survey asked participants to rank potential effects that can occur across five sustainability indicators (in bold below) from most important to avoid to least important to avoid.

Top responses across the five sustainability indicators for the effects most important to avoid are:

  1. Reduction in groundwater storage: need to drill new wells
  2. Degraded water quality: impact to crop yield, water treatment for domestic use
  3. Land subsidence: damage to wells, damage to infrastructure
  4. Chronic lowering of groundwater levels: irrigation wells becoming unproductive, reduction of well pumping capacity
  5. Interconnected surface water depletion: concern the trees and riparian habitat will dry up

DATE CHANGE – Board Meeting April 10 at 2:00 pm

The next scheduled McMullin Area GSA Board Meeting is Wednesday, April 10, 2019 at 2:00 pm.  The Board will meet at the Kerman Community Center, 15101 W. Kearney Blvd., Kerman, CA 93630.

Please note there will not be a 1:00 pm technical workshop.

Board Meeting March 6 at 2:00 pm

The next scheduled McMullin Area GSA Board Meeting is Wednesday, March 6, 2019 at 2:00 pm.  The Board will meet at the Kerman Community Center, 15101 W. Kearney Blvd., Kerman, CA 93630.

MAGSA developing groundwater level metrics, sustainability criteria considered for individual wells

Setting metrics for groundwater level is underway in MAGSA. At the February 6th Board Meeting, technical consultant Lynn Groundwater, Provost & Pritchard, discussed MAGSA’s methodology for setting the criteria that indicates whether or not sustainable levels of groundwater are met. Known as sustainable management criteria, these levels are guided by historical groundwater level data. The Kings Subbasin coordinated effort has adopted MAGSA’s methodology, with a few variances such as time period of data used.

Sustainable Management Criteria are the SGMA metrics of success. The criteria will include numeric values for groundwater depth. These values will guide sustainability efforts. The first value is the measurable objective: the groundwater depth you must reach and maintain. The second value is the minimum threshold: the groundwater depth you cannot drop below. A range of flexible values, the operational flexibility, will also be determined. The operational flexibility takes into account historical declines and the potential for future drought occurrences. The intent of operational flexibility is to allow groundwater depths to drop for a time (e.g. during a drought) as long as recovery toward the measurable objective follows. 

Using data to determine historical rates of water level decline is important for setting reasonable sustainability objectives. Historical data helps set the objectives. Future data will inform Agency managers of progress occurring toward achievement of those objectives. MAGSA is using historical data beginning 1990-present from wells within its service area. Progress toward the sustainability objectives will be tracked using data collected from the monitoring network of spatially distributed wells.  Moving forward, MAGSA plans to collect groundwater level data from each well at least every March and October. Each well within the network will have its own minimum threshold and measurable objectives against which to measure new data.

Sustainability progress will follow a phased mitigation schedule, starting slowly at first with increased rate of progress over time. This allows time to begin developing management actions and building projects that may not yield the bulk of results until further down the GSP implementation road.  

As Groundwater Sustainability Plan (GSP) draft chapters take shape for internal review, technical consultants are actively seeking public input early on from stakeholders during Board meetings and via the Undesirable Results online survey. The input received prior to the official GSP 90-day public review period allows maximum stakeholder concerns and preferences to be considered and included in early GSP chapter drafts.

Adopting Kings Basin Integrated Regional Water Management Plan provides avenue for future project funding

At the February 6th meeting, the Board unanimously approved the adoption of the updated Kings Basin Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (IRWMP). As an interested party of the Kings Basin Water Authority, MAGSA can add Groundwater Sustainability Plan (GSP) projects to the Water Authority’s project list allowing for future consideration in grant proposals.

Through IRWMP, the Water Authority supports the development of local solutions through projects and programs for the region’s most pressing water issues. Over the past decade, the Water Authority has brought in over $55 million in state and private grant funding to the region, which has been leveraged into over $87 million for planning and expanding local water management projects.

Stakeholders can impact MAGSA’s Groundwater Sustainability Plan development with survey participation

Stakeholders in the McMullin Area GSA (MAGSA) are being asked to provide their opinion on potentially adverse effects resulting from groundwater conditions. A survey has been created specifically for MAGSA stakeholders to share their concerns and help prioritize preferences of the GSA’s interested persons.

The responses gathered from the Undesirable Results survey will be used to develop a Groundwater Sustainability Plan (GSP) that considers stakeholder preferences for groundwater management. Input from stakeholders at this point of GSP development (timeline below) is important to ensure the GSA’s technical consultants are able to consider public feedback in the GSP chapters’ early drafts. The information from the survey will be considered when the criteria that measures MAGSA’s sustainability progress is established.

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The Undesirable Results survey will serve to prioritize participants’ concerns on the potential effects of reduction in groundwater storage, degraded water quality, land subsidence, chronic lowering of groundwater, and depletion of interconnected surface waters.

For survey purposes, MAGSA’s service area is divided into five survey areas allowing stakeholders to provide input based on knowledge from their specific area of residence and/or work. Because of these different areas, the survey will better inform regional trends within the GSA service area.

MAGSA’s technical consultants are committed in their effort to solicit and implement the feedback of interested parties throughout the development of a GSP.

CLICK HERE to take the survey and impact GSP development.